Does All Cloud Hosting Come With Some Risk

Here's what the Chief Technology Officer at McAfee has to say about cloud hosting: “don't do it!” Why? He believes that all cloud hosting comes with a large amount of risk. Choosing a cloud hosting provider, in his estimation, is like “picking a dog with the least fleas.” That doesn't sound too promising, does it?

cloud computing seo Does All Cloud Hosting Come With Some RiskSometimes, though, the cloud can't be avoided. When that same CTO had to contract out some help, he chose a company that dealt directly with the cloud. Suddenly, that same CTO who hated cloud dealings was, in fact, dealing with the cloud…and all cloud dangers. Why is the cloud so dangers?

Lurking Cloud Dangers

Placing any kind of information in any cloud means accepting a small amount of risk. Nothing is secure about cloud storage, and cloud security measures are often difficult to implement and track down. Just look at the mess Amazon has recently wound up in.

But, the cloud offers a great deal of ease too. Ease that's hard to ignore when it comes to cutting company costs. Those that once wanted nothing to do with the cloud now find themselves forced to use cloud hosting options. Is the cloud secure now, or is it just as bad as it once was?

It's All In the Targeting

Right now, hackers haven't really been able to target one massive cloud provider. However, this doesn't mean that specific targets of the major kind aren't in the very near future. Sooner rather than later, we may see cloud attacks happening on the very large scale.

It's also not completely true that the cloud is any riskier than internal cloud hosting  options. Why? More than 80% of all hack attacks are targeted towards a company's internal hosting system. More often than not, information hacks stem from the inside and work their way out. The opposite isn't usually true. Then again, this could be because many companies haven't switched over the the cloud just yet.

Does All Cloud Hosting Come With Some Risk: Companies Still Reluctant to Cloud Host

How many of the world's largest companies use cloud hosting providers? About one-fifth. That's a small number. Turn the tables, though, and look at smaller companies and startups, and that number certainly climbs. For companies that can't afford an internal hosting option, the cloud is simply a smarter financial plan, though it does come with some risk.

Weighing the financial savings against various cloud risks is one way to determine whether or not cloud hosting is a wise idea. For small businesses, opting for the best cloud hosting company with a great cloud security plan over the cost of hiring an IT department makes sense. Right now, cloud security is something of an overstatement.

Securing the cloud is a tough thing to do, but companies don't have to worry just yet. In the future, though, targeted cloud attacks may become more prevalent. Right now, hackers may attack a large cloud hosting provider, but aiming for specific companies within that cloud is a lot harder. Should you go the cloud hosting route? It's still the best solution if you want to save money.

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One thought on “Does All Cloud Hosting Come With Some Risk?

  1. NetSource has released new secure cloud infrastructure for small to medium sized businesses. Recent report shows 60% of first time efforts into cloud technologies failed. Company believes that it happened due to lack of understanding and knowledge and lack of help with a new technology. Company offers demonstration of cloud hosting to clients for testing solution before they confirm it. Company has included self-service portals, pay-for-use pricing, VLAN isolation, VM resource scaling, dynamically add or remove disk volumes, load balancing, self-managed firewall rules, resource usage reports, a SSAE16 Type 2, SOC1, SOC2 datacenter, etc.

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