4 Great Website Speed Measuring Tools

Website Speed Measuring Tools

If you want to ensure that visitors to your website have a good experience, the first thing you will want to do is improve the speed at which your website loads. This is especially important now that more people are browsing websites via their mobile phone – most will abandon a website if it takes more than 6 – 10 seconds to load according to this infographic.

So how can you find out how quickly your website is loading?

There are lots of free tools out there to choose from, but in this post, we are going to look at the tools that offer the most complete data to help you not only check your website speed, but also to help improve it.

Website Speed Measuring Tools: Pingdom

Pingdom offers a free website speed test that you can use to see how quickly your website is loading at any given time. You can configure the tool to test from Amsterdam, New York, or Dallas using the ‘Settings' dropdown option.

Website Speed Measuring Tools

Configuring the location is helpful for businesses targeting audiences are in a specific region. If you don’t choose a location, the default testing location is automatically set to Amsterdam.

When you click ‘Test Now,' the first thing you will see is a summary of your website’s performance.

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Along with the summary of your load time, you can also see how individual elements of your website are impacting load time by looking at the waterfall chart. As you are optimizing your website, you can use this tool to find the images, plugins, and other elements that are causing the most lag when visitors land on your website.

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Additional tabs in your free website speed test give you more information. Under ‘Performance Grade,' you can find recommendations to help you optimize your website.

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Under ‘Page Analysis,' you’ll see a summary of your page load details that breaks down elements types by load time and size.

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If you test your website often, you’ll also find a historical analysis of your website’s load time.

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You can also sign up for their ‘Premium Packages' starting at $9.95 per month to constantly monitor your website speed and up / downtime.

Website Speed Measuring Tools: WebPagetest

WebPagetest is another free tool you can use to analyze your website’s load time. This tool offers a lot more options as far as choosing location, browser, and advanced (optional) testing details.

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When you click ‘Start Test,' you will see a summary of your first visit load time along with repeat visit load times.

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Below this, you can click on the Waterfall View to see the individual elements on your website that affect load time.

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Beneath your first time and repeat visit waterfalls, you will find the content breakdown showing element types with their request time and size.

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When you click on the ‘Content Breakdown' link, you’ll get additional details in table and waterfall view.

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In addition to the standard website speed test, you can also run a ‘Visual Comparison' test between two or more URLs.

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This will show you how your website stacks up against competitors in terms of load time. If you’re only interested in site speed comparisons, you can also try to see which site loads faster.

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You can also use the ‘Mobile Test' to see how your website loads on particular mobile devices.

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This will take you to their partner site to show your website’s speed on the platform you selected.

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Since WebPagetest is an open source project, there are no premium membership options for continued monitoring. You can visit the ‘Test History' tab to see the tests you have run in the past too.

Website Speed Measuring Tools: GTmetrix

GTmetrix allows you to get recommendations from their network and YSlow on how to optimize your website’s speed. Simply enter your domain to begin.

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First, you will get your overall speed grade by GTmetrix and YSlow along with a summary.

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You will then have four tabs to choose from., starting with ‘GTmetrix' and ‘YSlow’s recommended ways to optimize your website.

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Under the ‘Timeline' tab, you’ll find the waterfall view of individual elements on your website and their load times.

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You can also sign up for a free account that will allow you to view historical analysis, setup monitored alerts, and test from multiple locations.

Website Speed Measuring Tools: Google Developer Page Speed Insights

It’s always been rumored that Google will lower your website’s ranking in general and mobile search if your site loads slowly. To support this theory, they provide a free page speed insights test for developers. Simply enter your URL and click Analyze.

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Google's tool will then provide you with scores for a website’s load time on both mobile and desktop devices, along with suggestions on how to improve each.

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You can click on the arrow for each suggestions to see further details, including the elements of your site that they apply to.

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This isn’t the only tool that Google offers for site speed. You can also set up ‘Site Speed' monitoring in your ‘Google Analytics.' This will allow you to see your load time per day and correlate it with traffic boosts, more or less sales, and other analytics data.

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By using the tools and recommendations provided by each option listed above, you should be able to achieve a lower overall load time on your website and give your visitors a positive user experience.

What are your best website optimization tips? Please share in the comments!

Select Best Web Hosting company

Web Hosting Companies Offering Support on Twitter

6 Examples of Web Hosting Companies Offering Support on Twitter

Whenever your website has an issue, whether it’s loading slowly or not responding at all, you want support. And you want it immediately. Of course, there are times that you can’t stop what you’re doing to call the support number, sit on hold forever, and then go over the problem in-depth. Maybe you’re at work and the website in question is personal, at a conference with back-to-back sessions, or on vacation.

This is where Twitter comes in. In less than a minute, you can alert your hosting company to a problem with your website. It’s a great alternative for companies that do not have live chat or people who need support while on a mobile device that can’t call.

WebHosting Companies Supporting Customers on Twitter

Without further ado, let’s look at six examples of how top web hosting companies are handing support requests on Twitter along with a sample of what you can expect if you tweet them.

GoDaddy

I like to start with GoDaddy simply because I received excellent Twitter support from them in the past. They use their main account (@GoDaddy) for support inquiries. All it took was a quick, “Hey @GoDaddy my website (kikolani.com) is down.” And I received a response within an hour. They will even follow you so they can use direct private messaging to relay sensitive information.

Here’s a little sample of their interactions with customers.

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You can see more of their interactions by looking at the @GoDaddy account. To see a particular support chat in detail, click the View Conversation link below the chat.

HostGator

HostGator has a separate Twitter account (@HGSupport) for support inquiries. You can start by either tweeting their main account (@HostGator) or their support account, and they will reply with the support account.

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You can see more of their interactions by looking at the @HGSupport account. To see a particular support chat in detail, click the View Conversation link below the chat.

Bluehost

Bluehost uses a separate account (@bluehostsupport) for customer support. You can start by either tweeting their main account (@bluehost) or their support account, and they will reply with the support account.

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You can see more of their interactions by looking at the @bluehostsupport account. To see a particular support chat in detail, click the View Conversation link below the chat.

Network Solutions

Some companies use Twitter support as a means of letting people know about other support options. While Network Solutions does offer some support on their Twitter account (@netsolcares), most of their replies include a link to their online support ticket system or phone number.

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You can see more of their interactions by looking at the @netsolcares account. To see a particular support chat in detail, click the View Conversation link below the chat.

FatCow

Fatcow primarily offers support from their main account (@FatCow). While they do have a dedicated support handle on Twitter (@FatCowSupport), it doesn’t seem to be very active. Their main account is, however.

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You can see more of their interactions by looking at the @fatcow account. To see a particular support chat in detail, click the View Conversation link below the chat.

Rackspace

Rackspace tries to head off support requests by adding alternative support information in their main Twitter bio (@Rackspace) pointing users to their support email or live chat. You can still see that they do offer response to inquiries as well.

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You can see more of their interactions by looking at the @Rackspace account. To see a particular support chat in detail, click the View Conversation link below the chat.

Tips for Getting Web Hosting Support on Twitter

So how can you ensure you get the best Twitter support with your web hosting company? Here are some tips.

  • If you’re shopping for a web hosting company, visit their Twitter accounts first to see if they are actively replying to support inquiries. When you visit their Twitter profile, make sure to show all tweets – some popular profiles default to no replies – so you can see whether they are responding to people. If you don’t see replies from their main Twitter account, look for a support account, often noted in the Twitter bio or on the background image of their Twitter page.
  • Follow your web hosting company on Twitter – both their main account and support account (if applicable). Keep both usernames handy.
  • When you tweet your web hosting company, be succinct and detailed about your problem. Include the domain(s) affected.
  • Don’t share sensitive information (account logins, passwords, etc.) as your tweets are public.
  • Be on the lookout for replies from your web hosting company and answer any questions they may have that will help them solve the problem.

Last, but not least, remember that not all inquiries can be handled on Twitter due to the 140-character limit. Consider this a starting point for support. Sometimes it can alert the support team to a problem they can fix on your own, saving you time spent holding on the phone or waiting for a live chat operator to become available. But be aware that other times, it could be just the start of the conversation.

How does your web hosting company do with support on Twitter? Please share your experiences in the comments!